Tag Archives: Leopards

My Favorite Four-Letter Word – Nkwe

November 24, 2012 – Chobe National Park

 

Image

In a Tree – Photography by Evan Schiller

You know the old saying, “When given lemons, make lemonade”. My corollary in Botswana: On a rainy day in Chobe, when the leopards don’t want to play, make the best of things and learn how to say “Leopard” in Setswanese.

We continued our routine of leaving camp at 5:30am and not returning until 7pm. We definitely kept Gwist busy. No rest for our weary guide. I can only imagine if Gwist has a blog out there and what he could be writing about us… If you want to read some funny stories from a guide’s perspective, pick up “Whatever You Do, Don’t Run: True Tales of a Botswana Safari Guide” by Peter Allison. It is full of guest/guide anecdotes and from what other guides have told me, it is all too true.

 

Image

Standing Her Ground – Photography by Lisa Holzwarth

We chose to start our day where we left the Leopard family the night before. Fresh tracks in the road alerted us to another Leopard/Hyena encounter. Who needs video cameras when the tracks can easily tell the story – the cubs were with their Mother when confronted by the Hyena. The Mother Leopard’s nails were firmly imprinted in the ground – she was definitely taking a stand for herself and the two cubs. We also noticed that yesterday’s kill (a young adult male impala), which had previously been deep in the bush, was now high up in a nearby tree.

We didn’t see any of the cats so decided to do one of our loops and look for more tracks along the way. Their kill was safely in the tree so we were confident the trio was relatively close. We returned about 30 minutes later to find the leopards out and another vehicle watching the action. We stayed here for the balance of the day, only taking a break for lunch at President’s Camp.

 

Image

Battling the Kill – Photography by Evan Schiller

Image

Dinner in a Tree – Photography by Evan Schiller

Given that we technically could not go off-road for closer viewing and photography, we were fortunate that the leopards had decided to pull this impala up a tall tree located at a crossroads of sorts, so we had two different angles from which we could potentially shoot. Most visitors take time midday for a siesta of sorts (which is also a quiet time for the big cats given the heat of the day), but we stayed put and took the opportunity to “abandon the law” and move a little closer to our subjects (even the Park Rangers take a siesta). Unfortunately, the leopards weren’t particularly cooperative, choosing to stay deep in the shade of the bush or up in the tree.

 

Image

“Chameleon” – Photography by Lisa Holzwarth

Image

Siesta Perspective – Photography by Lisa Holzwarth

We passed the time in the rain learning the Setswana names for the all the animals we had been fortunate to see and photograph. Anyone who looks at my journal will get a laugh out of the phonetic spelling that I also included for each name so that I would remember how to correctly pronounce the names of so many of these magnificent creatures. My friend Alison Nicholls, the wildlife artist who lived in Botswana for a number of years, may correct me on some of these, but this is what my ear heard at the time…

Lion – Tau (sounds like “tao ooh”)

Leopard – Nkwe (sounds like “uun kway” – with a long A)

Hyena – Phiri (sounds like “peer re” – with a long E on the second syllable)

Elephant – Tlou (sounds like either “toe” or proper name “cloow” with long o)

Giraffe – Thutwa (sounds like “two twa” with soft a)

Warthog – Kolobe (sounds like “koo lou bay” with a long a)

Baboon – Tshwene (sounds like “sTwen nee” with a long e on second syllable)

Hippo- Kubu (sounds like “koo boo”)

Porcupine – Noko (sounds like “no koo” with a long o on first syllable)

Zebra – Pitse ya naga (sounds like “peek e ahnaha” with soft e on second syllable)

Wildebeest – Kgokong (sounds like “co co nay”)

Wild Dog – Matlharelwa (sounds like “ma tah less wah”)

The afternoon brought a different sort of Phiri, of the “four-wheeled” variety, into our life. It felt like all the vehicles in Chobe were stopping to see “our” leopards. We got a very heavy downpour that afternoon which ultimately cleared out all the Phiri. I was happy for the Tlou and the other grazers.

Image

Sunsetting Flock – Photography by Lisa Holzwarth

 

 

Advertisements

Winners at the “Rosette” Wheel

November 22, 2012 – Chobe National Park

Up close and Personal - Lisa Holzwarth

Up close and Personal – Lisa Holzwarth

Today I get to share a photograph that still brings a smile to my face.   I vividly recall  the connectedness that comes with being face to face with this young leopard cub.  I found her deep chestnut eyes mesmerizing.

We were now three days into our Chobe trip without a single leopard sighting and I was beginning to wonder if our luck at the “rosette” wheel had finally run out.   We left camp again at 5:30am and headed first to Harvey’s Pans with the hope of seeing the lions and cubs that we had missed the afternoon before.  Unfortunately for us, the Pans were void of lions, though we did see some vultures and hyenas feeding on another dead baby elephant.  I don’t know when or how it died.

We continued to explore some new Pans and were through Warthog Valley when Gwist got a call on the radio that a mother leopard and cub had just been sighted – in the exact spot we had passed early in the morning!  Gwist dropped his head in his hands – I think his frustration equaled ours.  Evan asked if we were far from the leopards.  While the answer was “Yes”, Gwist said it was reported they were calm, though on the move.  He then threw the vehicle in reverse and floored it, “abandoning the law” and going 60 kilometers per hour (speed limit in the Park is 40).  We arrived at our destination to find three vehicles already viewing the leopards.  The leopards were about 50 to 60 yards away from us and still moving.  I have to admit that I didn’t think we had a chance in hell of seeing them up close – fortunately for us, I couldn’t have been more wrong.  The cub decided to pose on a termite mound and it only got better from there.

Savute Cub on Termite Mound - Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Cub on Termite Mound – Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Cub on the Move - Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Cub on the Move – Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Mother and Cub - Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Mother and Cub – Photography by Evan Schiller

Question: Why did the Mother Leopard cross the road?

Answer: I have absolutely no idea, but I’m glad she decided to do it in front of OUR vehicle.

Savute Synchronicity- Lisa Holzwarth

Savute Synchronicity – Lisa Holzwarth

Question: When is “bigger” not better?

Answer: When a leopard cub is so darn close to your vehicle you can (theoretically) touch it AND take its picture!

Evan was getting some great shots with his 400mm lens, despite our distance from the mother and cub.  I was struggling with my 200mm to get anything that I thought worthwhile, but then my luck changed and it became abundantly clear to me that “bigger is not always better”…   In the midst of jockeying for vehicular position, we found ourselves in the exact spot where the mother leopard decided to cross the road.  The mother crossed first.  I think the young female cub was somewhat afraid of all the cameras firing away so she hesitated.  We found ourselves face to face with this little one who appeared to be 5-6 months old.  Evan had stopped shooting because she was too close for his lens!  I, selfishly, took three more shots and then decided I was being unfair to the little one.  It was only a minute or two at most after I stopped shooting that she joined her mother on the other side of the road.  In those quiet moments we breathed in her wild beauty and innocence and rejoiced at our good fortune.

Can't get any closer than this - Lisa Holzwarth

Can’t get any closer than this – Lisa Holzwarth

Gwist told us that this mother was approximately 8 years old and that in addition to the female cub there was also a male sibling from the same litter who was quite shy.  Gwist guessed that he was probably still back at the family’s hideout.  The female cub was now about 50 yards ahead of the mother when we saw a hyena approaching.  We thought the hyena was close to where we estimated the cub to be, though we couldn’t see her.  Evan and I worried that the cub was in imminent danger.  Gwist assured us that our fears were unfounded and that even a cub of this size was not in serious danger… with only one hyena…  Fortunately for all involved, he was right.  We were then treated to some mother/daughter poses on a weathered tree trunk.  Soon thereafter, the mother and daughter split up – we assumed the mother was planning to hunt and she was sending the young one home.  We waited to see if we would see the mother again, but did not.

In Search of a  Greater Perspective - Lisa Holzwarth

In Search of a Greater Perspective – Lisa Holzwarth

When things had quieted down, Gwist shared an incredible story – it’s too bad there were no filmmakers in Chobe eight years ago to capture this tale for the big screen.  This same mother leopard had been orphaned along with two siblings (a male and female, all at six months of age) when their mother was killed by a lion.  Despite the odds, these three cubs survived to adulthood and are alive today in the Park, living in contiguous territories.

Quiet please - Lisa Holzwarth

Quiet please – Lisa Holzwarth

With the leopards no longer in view, we headed to President’s Camp for brunch.  We had gotten in the habit of staying out all day – so always brought a midday meal with us.   President’s Camp is named in honor of Botswana’s first President, Sir Seretse Khama who served in that role from 1966 (the year in which Botswana gained complete independence from England) until his death in 1980.  President’s Camp is no more than a cleared area along the river, but apparently it was a favorite camping spot for Sir Seretse Khama during his visits to the Park, which he nationalized in 1968.  Today, Ian Khama, Sir Seretse’s son, is the 4th President of the country and it’s my understanding that he is a strong supporter of Botswana wildlife and the big cats.  Our brunches at President’s Camp were generally pretty quiet, plenty of time to eat and caffeinate, “check the tires”, and catch an occasional fish eagle fly-by.

Fish Eagle at President's Camp - Photography by Evan Schiller

Fish Eagle at President’s Camp – Photography by Evan Schiller

We spent our afternoon back in search of the mother leopard.  While we saw leopard tracks just past the 2000 year old Baobab tree and close to another dead elephant, we did not see the leopard.  At one point we came upon a lone baby impala bleating for its mother.  The sight was heart-wrenching because the louder the baby cried, the more attention he was calling to himself.  For all practical purposes, we should have stayed with the impala but instead Gwist chose to circle the Ridge.  At one point Evan heard an adult impala snorting – usually the sign that it is calling attention to an intruder.  Gwist did not believe Evan’s ears.  We then caught sight of a tail – we think the white of a leopard’s tail.  While we couldn’t be certain given the thick brush amongst the rock outcroppings, we believe the leopard had made an impala kill.  It was now close to 7pm and we needed to be leaving the Park for the night but feeling like the Rosette Wheel was back in our favor.  Tomorrow we will be putting all our money on the number #3 – hoping to find the Leopard Trio of mother, daughter AND son.

Safari adventures continue – On to Chobe National Park and Praying for Pula

November 20, 2012

Counting Cats

“As I was going to St. Ives

I met a man with seven wives

Each wife had seven sacks

Each sack had seven cats

East cat had seven kits

Kits, cats, sacks, wives

How many were going to St. Ives?”

As we gathered up our cameras and gear in anticipation of visiting Chobe, we took note of the number of cats we had encountered to date and the St. Ives nursery rhyme came to mind.   We found that we could be much more definitive about the number of cats we encountered than the oft debated children’s rhyme.  Between, Zarafa, Selinda and Duba, we counted 40 different lions.  And at Selinda we were rewarded with seven sightings of five different leopards.  The five leopards were all female, three of which were adults.  Leopard #1 was approximately 8 years old and had a five-month old cub with her.  The next adult female we saw was about 4 years old and the daughter of Leopard #1.  The last adult female we came across was approximately 9 years old and she was also with a cub of approximately 7-8 months old.  Unfortunately no cheetahs were in the mix, though we knew not to expect them at Duba (nor leopards for that matter), given the watery terrain of the Delta and the lions’ dominance.  We wondered what Chobe would offer up to us, sightings of all three were certainly a possibility.

We also were very cognizant that we were visiting an area of Africa and in particular, Botswana, where the cats are relatively plentiful.  We were not blind to the fact that healthy numbers here did not necessarily correspond to healthy numbers elsewhere.  Unfortunately, many safari guests do not make this connection.  The reality is that lions have lost 80% of their historical range in Africa and recent surveys estimate that there may be fewer than 30,000 left in the wild, compared to 200,000 less than a century ago.  Leopards, while the most adaptable of the big cats, have disappeared from almost 40% of their historic range in Africa and 50% of their historic range in Asia and the cheetah has vanished from over 77% of its historic range in Africa.  It is estimated that there are fewer than 10,000 adult cheetahs left in the wild today (my statistics are coming from Panthera).  More camps and guides need to make their guests aware of this crucial situation.  Awareness is the first step in making a difference.

November 20, 2012 Flight to Savute Safari Lodge – Chobe National Park

We left Duba in the heat of the day.  Extreme heat does not make for pleasant flying on these single engine, five-seater light aircraft planes.  The Cessna 206, built in the US and known for the past forty years as the ”Land Rover of the Skies”, is as rugged as it’s four-wheeled cousin.  Anyone who has spent time in a real Land Rover knows that while you can probably get yourself out of pretty much any jam, it is sans luxury (do not confuse a real African Land Rover with the ones driven in Fairfield County, CT or Orange County, CA).   Bottom-line, there is no “climate control” on the Cessna 206, rather, the climate controls you.  Add a bit of bumpiness and someone with a weak stomach to the mix and you are just asking for trouble.  Unfortunately, one of the other two passengers (who already had been flying for an extra 20 minutes before picking us up) had eaten a big lunch before he got on the plane – big mistake for all of us.   The guy was already looking pretty green when they touched down to get us – his Grinch-like shading quickly intensified as we began to ride the warm air currents towards Chobe.  I am one of those people who is highly susceptible to the gag reflect – so I covered my ears and focused my attention on counting the elephants below us.  I quickly lost count to the multitude growing along the Delta’s meandering waterways as they guided us back to the northeast corner of Botswana.

Chobe National Park covers almost 12,000 square kilometers of the northern Kalahari and has four different areas to explore, each with its own unique ecosystem.  It is an area that has long attracted explorers – David Livingstone is known to have spent time in the area in the 1850’s.  Chobe was first designated a game reserve in 1961 and then in 1968 it was named a National Park.  Chobe is known for its large concentration of elephants – some estimate the number to be around 50,000, which would make it one of the largest concentrations of elephants in Africa, if not the largest.  Our guide, Gwist, said the number was probably closer to 70,000 or 80,000.  The herd has grown from a few thousand in the early 1990’s to its current numbers today.  What makes the area so intriguing is the dynamic of the animal migrations that flow through this Park.  The flow stems from long held traditions the animals have come to follow based on rain flow and the resultant availability of food.  In the Setswana language, “Pula” translates to “rain”.  Rain is the ultimate key to the region and life, so there’s good reason that Botswana’s currency is called the “Pula” and that when people raise their glasses to toast they say “Pula”.    We soon found that we were praying for Pula like everyone else.

Why Savute?  Our South African friend, Gordon Turner who runs Capescout, had recommended that we stay at the Savute Safari Lodge located near the Savute Marsh and covering the western stretch of the National Park.  FYI, we had spent the early part of our trip at the Zarafa and Selinda camps which lie to the west of the Savute Marsh.  Despite the relative proximity to Zarafa and Selinda, I was surprised at how different the topography and animal dynamics could be.  Zarafa and Selinda consist of riverine woodlands, open woodlands and floodplains while the Savute Marsh consists more of savannahs and grasslands.  The Marsh is what remains of an inland lake that dried up long ago with the shift of tectonic plates.  Today it is fed by the erratic Savuti Channel, whose water supply mysteriously turns on and off for long periods of time with various plate shifts.  Dereck and Beverly Joubert shot a National Geographic film many years ago called “The Stolen River”, which begins in 1982 and documents over the course of seven years the water’s disappearance from the Channel.  The water returned to the Channel in 2010, once again supplying the Marsh with the necessary elixir to feed the nutritious grasses the animals so readily seek.  Even in the dry season, the animals are attracted to the Marsh for nutrition.  The Lodge was constructed on the banks of the Savuti Channel and offered us some absolutely amazing elephant views.  Evan got some incredible shots minutes upon our arrival and just yards from our front porch.  He easily captured over 150 shots before we had unpacked our bags.  These two shots are absolutely adorable of an extremely young baby – perhaps just days old.

Baby Elephant in the Savute Channel - Photography by Evan Schiller

Baby Elephant in the Savute Channel – Photography by Evan Schiller

Baby Elephant II in the Savute Channel - Photography by Evan Schiller

Baby Elephant II in the Savute Channel – Photography by Evan Schiller

National Park versus Private Reserve?  Some of the previous camps were repeat visits for us.  We definitely wanted to add one last segment that would offer us a different terrain and potentially different animal dynamic.  That’s how Gordon decided upon Savute Safari Lodge on the edge of Chobe.   In addition to the large number of elephants, Chobe is also known for its elephant/lion relationship.  In addition to the lions, it is also home to a number of leopards, many who live in and around the rocky kopjies.  Gordon knew the Savute Safari Lodge owners well and thought the camp would be a good fit for us.  The only disconnect for us was that the three previous camps we had visited were all private reserves which meant that there were no hard and fast rules about how early you can go out for your morning drive or how late you return and whether you follow a road or go off-road.  Private reserves are all about your guide using his experience and discretion to avoid a problem before one is created – the intention being to observe the animals without creating disruption, as well as overall safety for everyone and thing involved.  With national parks come specific rules – which in retrospect is understandable given that there is much greater foot traffic coming through a national park than a private reserve, but rules can also be frustrating, especially for a photographer, when they tell you how early you can enter the park, how late you can stay and most frustrating of all, that you can’t go off road to track!  For the past ten days we had derived incredible joy and satisfaction by following cat tracks off-road for hours on end, many times to be rewarded with finding the cat who belonged to those tracks.  We soon discovered that in a national park, you can track a cat only until it goes off-road.  From that point on you technically have reached a dead-end unless your guide circles round to another road on the other side to determine if the cat continued on in that direction.  Sometimes you get lucky, but not always.   Gwist was a particular stickler to the rules – his phrase for going off-road was “abandoning the law”.  Again, I appreciated his concern – if a guide is caught “abandoning the law” for any number of infractions, he could lose his guiding license and face financial fines.  We grinned and beared it as best we could, but it was not without an occasional grumble on our end.  As I reflect back on this segment of the trip, it all worked out in the end.  We captured some great shots.  I think a lot of those shots were the result of our persistence and patience while others were derived from a little bit of luck.  All things being equal, we probably would opt for private reserves, but I feel there will still be some very special national parks in our travel future.

What happens when the “Rainy Season” is missing the Rain?

First Afternoon Game Drive – November 20, 2012

No surprise, we were the first out at 3:30pm for the afternoon game drive.  The rainy season was extremely overdue, and the ramifications of the delay soon became sadly evident.

Gwist took us into the Marsh and introduced us to two of the five male lions in this particular coalition whose territory we were now in the midst of.  These guys were both between 5 or 6 years old and Evan and I think they are actually larger than the Skimmer Male at Duba (who, to date, was the biggest guy in our eyes).  As we learned, while the Duba lions eat buffalo, the Chobe lions aren’t afraid to take down elephants.

King of Savute - Photography by Evan Schiller

King of Savute – Photography by Evan Schiller

Savute Profile - Lisa Holzwarth

Savute Profile – Lisa Holzwarth

Marsh Patrol - Lisa Holzwarth

Marsh Patrol – Lisa Holzwarth

The afternoon proved to be a difficult one.  The elephants had descended upon the Marsh for sustenance.  Some had managed to bring their young.

Got Milk? - Lisa Holzwarth

Got Milk? – Lisa Holzwarth

Follow the Leader - Lisa Holzwarth

Follow the Leader – Lisa Holzwarth

But it was the first time we were faced with watching elephants literally dying of starvation.  We wondered if the young ones we were watching today would make it.  The delay of the rain by over a month was limiting the growth of the grasses and other vegetation necessary to sustain life.  The elephants were depleting their stores of body fat and were not getting enough nutrients from the sparse vegetation left in the area.   A lot of the mopane trees had been stripped bare – what a difference to what we had experienced with the mopane and overall vegetation near Selinda and Zarafa.

It was sobering to see elephants, who had dropped to their knees without the strength to get up, dying in that position.  That afternoon we counted six among the dead in our travels.  Imagine the stench of multi-ton corpses.  The sight and smell lingers.  Gwist says there are probably about 20,000 elephant living in this general area of the Park.  This was certainly a time when the predators had easy pickings.  And for all of you who are wondering what happens with the tusks given the world’s (and especially Asia’s) demand for ivory, the Park Rangers make note of the fallen elephants and ultimately remove the tusks so that they are not a temptation for others.  We were told that they are stored by the government so that they do not end up on the world market.

Harsh Reality - Lisa Holzwarth

Harsh Reality – Lisa Holzwarth

In addition to the two 5 or 6 year old males, we also got to see two younger male lions (probably around the age of 2.5 years old).  The younger males are in the midst of being pushed out of the pride by their mother who has now apparently finally begun to accept this Group of Five coalition as the dominant males in the area.  The younger males are no match for the coalition and are of the age where they will now need to strike out on their own.

As I lay in my bed that night I listened to the elephants down on the riverbank splashing in the little bit of water running through it and prayed for Pula.

Words of Wisdom from a little Bear as we say goodbye to Selinda

November 16 – Last Morning Game Drive – Selinda

“How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”
A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

Selinda Sunrise - Photography by Evan Schiller

Selinda Sunrise – Photography by Evan Schiller

Isaac spent a good deal of time looking for tracks.  We were racing around a corner because Isaac had heard a lion’s roar in the distance when we came face to face, again, with a monstrous-sized hippo  – our second close encounter in four days.  Isaac threw the vehicle into reverse faster than we could recite “Our Father who Art in Heaven”.  Despite the fact that we were traveling in a mega-heavy Land Cruiser with lots of momentum going our way, we bowed to the beast and gave her plenty of leeway: Advantage Hippo.

"Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there" - Lisa Holzwarth

“Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there” – Lisa Holzwarth

Never did find the elusive lion that morning but we were fortunate to meet up again with Leopards #4 and #5 – this represented our seventh leopard sighting in four days – thank you Isaac, you are truly masterful!  We followed the mother and cub for probably 30 minutes, not really sure where they were going, though the mother did seem to be on a mission.  She ultimately decided on one particular leafless tree to rest under.  It was a hot day and it didn’t make any sense to Isaac why she had made this choice.  As he took a closer look, his eye finally came to rest on a young impala high up in the branches.  This reminded Isaac of a funny guide story – this comes in under the extensive category of “really stupid guest questions”.  As the story goes, a guide had brought his guests to view a leopard up in a tree with her impala kill.  I guess the impala was positioned in such a way that it wasn’t completely obvious that it was in fact dead, leading the inquisitive guest to ask the guide “why did the impala climb up the tree??”.  A corollary to that story was the guest who asked “why was the zebra sleeping so close to the lion??”.  The best guides seem to have the perfect mix of intelligence, awareness, patience, bravery and definitely a sense of good humor.

Hello and Goodbye - Lisa Holzwarth

Hello and Goodbye – Lisa Holzwarth

Here are some fun shots of mother and daughter taken by Evan.  While the little one finally noticed her “impala on a stick” snack, she did not venture up the tree before we had to leave for “Selinda International” at 10:10am.  Mother and Daughter really gave us a special send-off.

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

Photography by Evan Schiller

We gave a sad farewell to our old friends Tony and Michelle and our newest friend, Isaac Seredile and the many rosette’d four-legged friends he introduced us to.  Selinda had once again, treated us to amazing animals, life-altering experiences and long-lasting friendships.   Special thanks to Isaac and Lizzie (Selinda Camp Manager) for making our trip so memorable.

Kealeboaga and Selasemtle… but looking forward to being able to say Dumela again as soon as we possibly can!  (And for those of you less “fluent” in Setswana, Kealeboaga means “thank-you” and Selasemtle means “good-bye”.  Dumela, of course, is a welcome greeting – I hope that I don’t have to wait too long before I can hear and say “Dumela” again…)

Lisa Holzwarth, Tony Pisacano, Isaac Seredile, Michelle Pisacano, Evan Schiller

Lisa Holzwarth, Tony Pisacano, Isaac Seredile, Michelle Pisacano, Evan Schiller

Evan and Lisa - Photography by Tony Pisacano

Evan and Lisa – Photography by Tony Pisacano

Our Chariot Awaits - Photography by Tony Pisacano

Our Chariot Awaits – Photography by Tony Pisacano

Dr. Seuss and Why Elephants are Even Smarter than You Think

November 15 – Morning Game Drive – Selinda

Dawn Patrol

Dawn Patrol – Lisa Holzwarth

We started the morning by reacquainting ourselves with “the Huntress”, ie., Leopard #3, and followed her as she casually made her way along her dawn patrol route.  She was a great poser – no action per se, but she really worked the camera.

Vantage Point

Vantage Point – Lisa Holzwarth

Daughter of Selinda - Photography by Evan Schiller

Daughter of Selinda – Photography by Evan Schiller

Even while on Safari, golf is not far from Evan’s thoughts – note the insignia on his broad rimmed hat!  We stopped at the Hippo pool for a little tea/coffee  break – catching Evan in the rare moment when he doesn’t have a camera in his hand.

Evan Schiller - the "Master(s)" Photographer

Evan Schiller – the “Master(s)” Photographer

It was only moments later when he decided to position himself closer to the water and get cozy with some of his buddies prior to their delicate “synchronized swimming” routine.  In retrospect, one of the more civilized encounters we had with these big guys.

Tea for Two - Lisa Holzwarth

Tea for Two – Lisa Holzwarth

After the Hippo Pool, we continued on our trek, coming across a number of zebra.  Their unique markings are amazing and the patterns , especially when standing next to each other really made my eyes work overtime to grasp their complexity.  The Zebra and its stripes remind me of a Dr. Seuss quote, “Today you are You, that is truer than true.  There is no one alive who is Youer than You”.

"Nowhere to Hide" or "Know where to Hide"? - Lisa Holzwarth

“Nowhere to Hide” or “Know where to Hide”?

Now to the take-away of the morning for me.  Isaac took us through a beautiful Mopane grove and gave us an elephant ecology lesson.  The leaves of the Mopane trees are shaped like butterfly wings and are a big source of nutrition for the elephants.  The adult female elephants are very conscientious arborists – they eat from the top of the Mopane tree to ensure that the trees don’t grow too high so as to become out of reach for the baby elephants and other grazers that seek its nourishment.  By eating the Mopane from the top, the adult female elephants force the tree to sprout and grow more branches and fresh leaves thicker and lower to the ground.  This was an amazing thing to witness – this Mopane grove looked like a humanly cultivated orchard or vineyard – amazing that the horticulturalists were elephants!  Keeping to my Dr. Seuss thread, the female elephants actions and intentions remind me of the Lorax quote – “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better.  It’s not.”.

As much as the females impressed me with their horticultural prowess , the males are a whole other story… while the females make a point of protecting and nurturing the trees, the males are all about knocking them down.  I guess we can’t blame them too much – the males are pushed out of their herd when they are only about 12 years old (which is pretty young in elephant years).  It’s kind of like kicking your teenage boy out of the house before he’s gone through puberty and before he’s learned more than the most basic of manners.  In addition to not learning proper tree-trimming techniques from their mothers, these young males soon find themselves needing to prove themselves around the other sub-adult males they are now forced to hang with.  Proving oneself usually involves determining who has the greatest brute strength and what better way to prove brute strength than your ability to knock down trees – the bigger the better.  Unfortunately this bad behavior has the tendency to grow exponentially – one male knocks down a tree to prove himself, only to have another male knock down a larger tree to prove himself – you can see how this escalates.  And then, factor in the testosterone surge when these big guys go into musth – you thought human females had hormonal issues…  These big guys can become downright aggressive and quite destructive during musth – and besides, everybody is laughing at you because it looks like you have five legs.  (I regret that I did not get a picture of this beautiful Mopane forest because what we experienced in Savute was the antithesis of this situation – more about that later).

The Mother of all Tree-huggers – Lisa Holzwarth