Tag Archives: Mala Mala

A Worthy Cause – Rhinos Without Borders

The LEO Chronicles got its start talking about Big Cats conservation. Today I am broadening the conversation to bring awareness to an important African wildlife initiative currently underway where time is of the essence. Rhinos without Borders is an expansive project being undertaken by Great Plains Conservation and &Beyond, two extraordinary eco-tourism travel organizations who each operate safari camps in Botswana. Evan and I have been fortunate to visit Great Plains Conservation’s concessions at Zarafa, Selinda and Duba Plains. Great Plains also has concessions in Kenya, while &Beyond’s properties can be found in ten African countries as well as five countries in Asia. Dereck Joubert, CEO of Great Plains, and Joss Kent, CEO of &Beyond, are leading by example and stand in solidarity to save the rhino from its current path towards extinction.

Speaking from our own experience, in our three trips to Southern Africa, which includes two visits to South Africa and two to Botswana, we only saw rhino while visiting the Mala Mala reserve in South Africa (which is in close proximity to Kruger National Park). We were incredibly fortunate on one morning to come across a mother rhino and her young calf, who our guide estimated to probably be about a month old. Needless to say, he had not yet grown that coveted horn…

Baby Rhino & Mother - Photography by Evan Schiller

Baby Rhino & Mother – Photography by Evan Schiller

Rhinos are dying at a rate of at least one every eight hours. News outlets are reporting the recurring atrocities of rhino poaching on the African continent, particularly in South Africa where the majority of rhino can be found, and sadly, easily killed. As of the end of July at least 622 rhino have been killed in Africa, with approximately 2/3’s of those deaths occurring in Kruger National Park.   The rhinos are killed solely for their horn, which Traditional Asian Medicine purports to provide certain healing qualities, including everything from reducing fever to curing cancer (this has been scientifically proven to be false). Asian demand for rhino horn, particularly in Vietnam, has fueled the black market (in this case “Black” market literally means “Death” for the rhino). Last year over 1,000 rhino were killed, so at the current rate of three rhino deaths per day, it can only be assumed that a similar number will be reached in 2014. More sobering is that professionals on the ground, like Les Carlisle, a long-time Group Conservation Manager at &Beyond, believe that the rhino death rate is probably UNDER-estimated by 20% because not all killings are reported or even discovered. Poachers are highly sophisticated, heavily armed and technologically savvy. Their job is made easier in South Africa where the animals are clustered in parks and private reserves located near more densely populated areas than exist in Botswana. As I researched this epic problem, I was also shocked by the accounting of the number of wildlife rangers who have died at the hands of poachers.  A National Geographic Daily News article that came out June 27, 2014 titled “For Rangers on the Front Lines of Anti-Poaching Wars, Daily Trauma” quotes Sean Willmore, the President of the International Ranger Federation and Founder of the Thin Green Line Foundation, as saying that worldwide, at least two rangers are killed every week in the line of duty. StopRhinoPoaching.com, which specifically tracks poaching in Africa, reports that a minimum of 54 poachers in South Africa were fatally wounded in shoot-outs with anti-poaching units in 2011 and 2012. This number increased to 50+ in 2013 with the majority occurring in Kruger and a smaller number in KwaZulu-Natal. A further 30 poachers have been shot and killed in shoot-outs so far this year. Bottom-line, rhino poaching is a dangerous and deadly business for everyone involved, but most deadly for the rhino and its ability to survive as a species.

Mala Mala Momma & Baby Rhino - Lisa Holzwarth

Mala Mala Momma & Baby Rhino – Lisa Holzwarth

Baby Rhino & Oxpecker - Photography by Evan Schiller

Baby Rhino & Oxpecker – Photography by Evan Schiller

Rhinos are at their Tipping Point: We are losing rhinos to poaching faster than the rate at which rhinos can reproduce. The white rhino gestation period is 16 months and a new calf birth usually occurs every 2 to 3 years, while the black rhino’s gestation is 15-16 months with a new calf being born every 2.5 to 4 years. It should be no surprise that given a rhino’s size (1800 to 2700 kgs for the white and 800 to 1350 kgs for the black) that their gestation period is one of the longest in the animal kingdom. (And by the way, white rhino and black rhino are both gray.)  Besides the size differential, the main difference between the two species is the shape of their mouths. White rhino have broad flat lips for grazing, while black rhino have pointed lips for eating foliage.  The IUCN SSC’s African Rhino Specialist Group estimates that there are probably 20,000 white rhino left on the African continent, almost 19,000 of which can be found in South Africa. They estimate that the total African black rhino population is approximately 5,000 of which 2,000 are in South Africa and 1,750 are in Namibia (these population numbers were as of December 31, 2012).  Poaching has been growing 39% a year from 2008 to 2013. If this keeps up, the IUCN SSC’s African Rhino Specialist Group projects that the tipping point could be reached somewhere in the 2014 to 2016 period. Given that it is most likely that rhino kill rates are underestimated, we are probably already there. This chilling scenario is not hyperbole.

Making a Difference for the Common Good. It is the intention of this joint venture, working with the support of Africa Foundation, to relocate at least 100 rhino (both black, Diceros bicornis, and white, Ceratotherium simum) from high density/high risk poaching areas of South Africa to Botswana where population densities are significantly lower and poaching is virtually non-existent. The translocation would also create breeding diversity, strengthening the rhino gene pool by creating new stock in a safer long-term environment with the intention that the Botswana national herd might reach 400 rhino by 2016 (it currently stands at approximately 75). This will not occur naturally, but only by taking immediate action like that envisioned by Rhinos without Borders.

Putting the Plan into Action. The Rhinos without Borders team of experts believes that to acquire and translocate 100 rhino to Botswana will cost approximately US$7 to $8 million. The absolute number is somewhat fluid and will depend on how many animals are freely given to the cause (this includes private landowners and/or national parks donating their animals with the intention to make them safer, versus purchasing rhino at the annual South African Wildlife auction). The general plan is to acquire young adults in the ratio of 1 male for every 4 females, but this will ultimately be determined by what is offered. Transportation of the animals is also a large factor in the financial equation and there is talk of the possibility of plane capacity being donated to help with the safe transport. If not by plane, the rhinos will be moved via truck. 40% of the funding is projected to be used for the capture, transport, bomas, quarantine and release of the animals. The balance, 60%, will go to continued conservation, protection and monitoring of the animals. The team will continue to work closely with Botswana’s Ministry of Environment, the Department of Wildlife and the Botswana Defense Force to ensure the safety of the animals in their new environs. It is the intention of Rhinos with Borders that after three years the translocated rhino and their offspring will become the responsibility of the people of Botswana to proudly protect and grow.

Mala Mala Rhino family - Lisa Holzwarth

Mala Mala Rhino family – Lisa Holzwarth

Opportunities to Donate!!!!

Rhinos with Borders is supported by, and donations can be made through the following organizations:

Great Plains Foundation, a US public charity contributions to which may be tax deductible for US federal income tax purposes under Section 501 (c) (3) of the US Internal Revenue Code. Visit: www.greatplainsfoundation.com

Africa Foundation, a separate independent organization registered with the South African Revenue Service as a Public Benefit Organization (PBO) and as a Nonprofit Organization (NPO). Visit: http://www.africafoundation.org.za

Africa Foundation (USA), a US public charity, contributions to which may be deductible for US federal income tax purposes under Section 501 (c) (3) of the US Internal Revenue Code. EIN 88-0461880. Visit: www.africafoundation.org

Africa Foundation (UK), a separate independent organization registered with the UK Charities Commission. UK registered Charity Number 1092616. Visit: www.africafoundation.org

Great Plains Conservation has also generously donated its green season beds (for travel between November 1, 2014 and May 31, 2015) under an initiative called Zeros for Rhinos. Guests can elect to stay at selected Great Plains Conservation Camps and donate the cost of that directly to the Foundation towards this rhino effort.

Please check out this link to Rhinos Without Borders which includes a special message from Dereck and Beverly Joubert discussing the importance of this very special project: http://eepurl.com/0bXWn

Evan and I firmly believe in Rhinos Without Borders and the people driving this effort and we are making a personal donation to support this important and worthy cause.

Take us to Botswana! - Lisa Holzwarth

Take us to Botswana! – Lisa Holzwarth